Duncan Worley is a student and wrote this for a class project. 

13 May 2017

 Arts Experience - Texas Musicians Museum

Tucked away in a small corner of Irving, Texas, one can find a very curious building. Past the piano key crosswalk, and beyond the doors covered in the names of hit songs, you’ll find the one and only Texas Musicians Museum.

Like an oasis in a desert of musical history, the Texas Musicians Museum is just as inviting, and as unique as one would expect. The facility consists of what seems like a renovated supply shop that houses the museum exhibits and an indoor stage. Located outside is the large event stage and room for the many live concerts and parties that can take place. However,

scattered throughout the area is a highly concentrated amount of history, both obvious and inconspicuous, for those with keen eyes and minds, and those who are there only for the music.

The museum itself consists of only a small portion of the building, a room about the size of a lecture hall. But inside, it is a highly concentrated amount of memorabilia, information, pictures, and various artifacts from throughout the ages of Texas music.

Lining the walls one can find information about many famous artists beginning with Mary Carson, the first Texan to have made a record, and did so for Thomas Edison himself. Continuing along the walls you’ll find interesting knowledge about people and bands such as Willie Nelson, Barry White, Pantera, Johnny Winter, Stevie Ray Vaughan, Jimmie Vaughan, Destiny’s Child, Sly Stone, Gene Autry, Dale Evans, Tommy Duncan, Ernest Tubb, Janis Joplin, Jeannie C. Riley, George Strait, and many more! Some of these names you may have heard of, while others may be completely unfamiliar to you. But before you leave the Texas Musicians Museum you will know something about each of them, whether it be from reading the signs or listening to the very knowledgeable tour guide and museum owners.Being inside the museum is like being immersed in a melting pot of history and culture. All around you, you are surrounded by many types of music such as Blues, Country, Metal, Soul, Pop, and Willie (Willie Nelson constitutes his own style of music). All these types of music span from across the years, Mary Carson recorded her song, “Oh Dry Those Tears”, in 1912, while other authors like Michael Nesmith continue to write and record today.

Being inside the museum is like being immersed in a melting pot of history and culture. You are surrounded by many types of music such as Blues, Country, Metal, Soul, Pop, and Willie (Willie Nelson constitutes his own style of music). All these types of music span from across the years, Mary Carson recorded her song, “Oh Dry Those Tears”, in 1912, while other authors like Michael Nesmith continue to write and record today. The stories of artists like Zuzu Bollin even provide a humorous lens with roots to my hometown Frisco, Texas. Zuzu began his career in Dallas during the 1950s, but for some time the Blues community thought him dead until he was rediscovered by Chuck Nevitt who put him back onstage to record his first album ‘Texas Bluesman’.

The Texas Musicians Museum is an altogether wonderful experience, to be immersed in so much culture and history encourages their unwitting pupils to research their own native artists. Not only will a person leave there with a new insight into Texas’ indigenous singers, many will have their musical curiosity awakened to the history of their towns. The Texas Musicians Museum is a secret gem in the Texas rough, a tiny piece of historical gold. I fully encourage the support of this hometown treasure!

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